Preserve Your Modern Home

 


Listing in the National Register of Historic Places provides formal recognition of a property’s historical, architectural, or archaeological significance based on national standards used by every state.    Listing in the National Register places no obligations on private property owners: no restrictions on the use,treatment, transfer, or disposition of private property.

The National Register nomination process starts with your State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). Contact your SHPO for National Register information, research materials, and necessary forms to begin the nomination process. Nominations canbe submitted to your State Historic Preservation Office from property owners,historical societies, preservation organizations, government agencies, andother individuals or groups. 

How are Properties Evaluated?

To be considered eligible, a property must meet the National Register Criteria for Evaluation. This involves examining the property's age, integrity, and significance.

  • Age and Integrity. Is the property old enough to be considered historic (generally at least 50 years old) and does it still look much the way it did in the past?
  • Significance. Is the property associated with significant architectural history, landscape history, or engineering achievements?

National Register Listing Process


Nominations can be submitted to your SHPO from property owners, historical societies, preservation organizations, governmental agencies, and other individuals or groups. Official National Register Nomination Forms are available online or from your State Historic Preservation Office. National Register Bulletins can also provide guidance on how to document and evaluate certain types of properties. Sample nominations provide additional useful information.

Listing in the National Register of Historic Places provides formal recognition of a property’s historical, architectural, or archeological significance based on national standards used by every state.

Listing and Ownership

  • National Register listing places no obligations on private property owners. There are no restrictions on the use, treatment, transfer, or disposition of private property.
  • National Register listing does not lead to public acquisition or require public access.
  • A property will not be listed if, for individual properties, the owner objects, or for districts, a majority of property owners object.
  • National Register listing does not automatically invoke local historic district zoning or local landmark designation.

For further information on how to list a modern building contact glasshouse@nthp.org. 

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